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Toddler Cabled Slouchy Beanie

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Here is the free pattern for the “Toddler Cabled Slouchy Beanie" that I made for my daughter Myla to match the adult one that I made for myself!

***PLEASE follow along with the step-by-step post HERE as I showed how to work the cabling in detail with plenty of photos :)

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Materials:

  • 4 mm crochet hook (I used this to achieve smaller, more delicate cables compared to my adult beanie- you can choose to use either a 4 or 5 mm hook and adjust numbers as necessary)
  • Medium worsted weight yarn (I used Lion Brand’s Heartland in “Grand Canyon”, 1 skein)
  • Optional: yarn needle to seam up beanie; Clover Pom Pom Maker

Special stitches:

  • Front Post Treble Crochet (Fptc): Yarn Over (YO) twice, insert hook from front to back around post of stitch indicated. YO and pull up a loop, [YO and draw through 2 loops on hook] 3 times.
  • Back Post Double Crochet (Bpdc): YO, insert hook behind post of stitch (insert hook from back to front of stitch), YO, pull up a loop, YO, (pull through 2 loops) twice.
  • Front Post Double Crochet (Fpdc): YO, insert hook behind post of stitch (insert hook from front to back of stitch), YO, pull up a loop, YO, (pull through 2 loops) twice. 

Ribbed Band:

Chain 7

R1: In back loops only, Sc 1 in second chain from hook and in each chain across (6 sc).

R2-67: Chain 1, turn.  In back loops only, Sc 1 in second chain from hook and in each chain across (6 sc).

My ribbed band measured 16.5” or 40.5 cm.  Adjust this number based on desired size.  Fasten off and leave long end for sewing.  Sew short ends together to form ribbed band.  

Cabled Body:

***In each round, the Ch 2 does not count as a stitch.  When joining at the end of each round, join to the stitch indicated (NOT the Ch 2) to make an invisible seam.

Join yarn with sl st at any point around edge of band.

Round 1: Chain 2, work one double crochet in same st as Chain 2.  Work 65 dc as evenly as possible around edge of band.  Join with sl st to first dc (66 dc).  [If adapting the pattern, make sure your final number of dc’s is a multiple of 6.]  

R2: Chain 2, Bpdc around first dc from previous round (same dc you joined to from Round 1).  Bpdc around next st.  Work cabling: {Skip next two dc, 2 Fptc around next 2 dc.  Fptc around first skipped dc and next dc}.  *2 bpdc in next two st.  Work cabling: Sk next 2 st, 2 Fptc around next 2 st.  Fptc around first skipped st and next st.*, rep 11 times.  Join with sl st to first Bpdc.  (11 cables around with 11 sets of Bpdc’s between)

R3: Chain 2, Bpdc around first Bpdc from previous round.  Bpdc around next st.  Fpdc 4.  *Bpdc 2, Fpdc 4*, rep 11 times .  Join with sl st to first Bpdc.  (11 cables around with 11 sets of Bpdc’s between)

R4: Repeat Round 3.

With rounds 2-4, one set of cables is complete!  Keep repeating Rounds 2-4 until desired length.  

R5-7: same as Round 2-4

R8-10: same as Round 2-4

R11-13: same as Rounds 2-4

R14-16: same as Rounds 2-4

R17-19: same as Rounds 2-4

R20-22: same as Rounds 2-4

I completed 7 sets of cables with this beanie measuring 9” or 22 cm (including ribbed band).  Fasten off and leave long end for sewing.  Weave yarn through ends of last round, pull tightly and sew hole shut.  Alternatively, seam up beanie using this method HERE.

Optional: Add pom pom (I used my “Clover Pom Pom Maker”).  Attach pom pom to beanie and you are DONE!

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If you would like to adapt this pattern for a baby, child, teen, etc., please check out this very helpful post by Anne HERE that contains a chart with head circumference sizes (your ribbed band) as well as general hat height (the number of rounds or length of the beanie)! 

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This toddler version is such a cute accompaniment to my adult “Cabled Slouchy Beanie”!  Don’t forget to check out the step-by-step blog post and free pattern to the adult beanie HERE

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Enjoy matching with your mini-me’s!  These “Cabled Slouchy Beanies" are really perfect for the fall and winter and would make great gifts for mommies, daddies, and their little ones!

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Stay tuned for this same beanie but in a chunky version using super bulky (level 6) yarn!   Keep up with all my updates on FacebookTwitter (@AllAboutAmi) & Instagram (@AllAboutAmi)!   Happy cabling!  ❤

Amazon Affiliate Links

Lion Brand Heartland Yarn Grand Canyon 

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Cabled Slouchy Beanie

I love learning new crochet techniques, whether it be “The Invisible Decrease" for amigurumi or how to create a ribbed effect for sweaters.  Last year, I discovered that the beautiful look of cabling could be achieved through crochet (not just through knitting!) when I followed Julee Reeves’ free pattern to make these gorgeous cabled wrist warmers pictured below (I blogged about them HERE).  I vowed that I would apply this new cabling technique I learned for future projects, and in last year’s blog post, I even mentioned that I might try and make a cabled hat!  Here we are today, and I am excited to show you the “Cabled Slouchy Beanie" that I designed! 

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I used Lion Brand’s “Heartland" yarn in "Grand Canyon which is a medium worsted weight (level 4) yarn.  It’s a taupe and grey blend with hints of gold that is incredibly soft with a beautiful sheen to it- so perfect for fall!  I used a 5 mm crochet hook with this yarn to make my cabled beanie.

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I started off by crocheting a ribbed band, similar to the ribbed band of the “Urban Jungle Slouchy Beanie”.  I chained 10 and then worked single crochets in the back loops only to create the ribbed effect.  The back loops are the loops that are further away from you as pictured below.

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The ribbed band is starting to build up…

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After 75 rows, my band measured about 21.5” or 54 cm.  You can measure your own head and adjust this number as necessary- keep in mind that this band will stretch over time with repeated wears!

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Next up, I sewed the short ends together to form the ribbed band!  As a warning, this pattern is not for beginners as it is more technical and uses more complicated crochet stitches.  I tried to be as detailed as possible with this next series of photos and with the pattern instructions- they may look and sound complicated, but once you get the hang of it, this project will work up quickly.  Ryan was laughing as he helped me proofread this blog post as he did not understand the next part whatsoever as it was so technical!

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I began working double crochets around the edge of the band to create Round 1 of the cabled body of the beanie.  First I chained 2 and then worked one double crochet in the same stitch.  This is important for the invisible seam we will be creating whenever we join each round!  The chain 2 does not count as a stitch in the final stitch count at the end of each round.

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After working 72 double crochets around the band, this is what I was left with.  If you are adjusting this pattern with your own numbers, you need to make sure that the total number of double crochets you are left with is a multiple of 6 (i.e. add or subtract multiples of 6).  Try to space the double crochets as evenly as possible across the band, but it’s not a big deal if some are a little more bunched or spaced apart if you are trying to attain the right number- it will even out in subsequent rounds.  

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When closing up this round, it is important that you join with a slip stitch to the first double crochet and not the Chain 2 (you just ignore the Ch 2 like it’s not there).

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Next you Chain 2…

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Then you work one back post double crochet around the same double crochet that you slip stitched to when you joined the round.  Then you do another back post double crochet around the next double crochet.

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Then the cabling begins!  You skip the next two double crochets and then work two front post treble crochets around the next two stitches.

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Then you work two front post treble crochets around the previously skipped double crochets.  They will cross over the other 2 fptc’s that you just did, which gives the cabling effect.

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Next you work two back post double crochets around the next two stitches.  You continue alternating with this pattern of doing two back post double crochets and working the cabling around the next four stitches.  This is why you must work with multiples of six (two for the bpdc’s and four for the fptc’s).

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When it is time to close up this round and subsequent rounds, make sure you slip stitch to the top of the first Bpdc, not the Chain 2.

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Round 2 is complete!

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To begin Round 3, we chain 2, then do our two bpdc’s.  These bpdc’s help push these stitches back which makes the cabling stand out even more.

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Next we work two Fpdc’s around the two stitches that are underneath the cable.  Make sure you do not accidentally do them around the wrong stitches (i.e. the ones that cross over) as this will undo your cabling!

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Then you work two Fpdc’s around the two stitches that cross over the cabling.  This step helps solidify or lock your cabling from the previous round into place!

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After continuing with this same pattern, here is what you are left with after completing Round 3.  The cabling is really taking shape!

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In Round 4, you do your 2 bpdc’s as normal and then work 4 Fpdc’s as indicated below.

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Our cabling is now complete!  Each cable is worked over three rounds (Rounds 2-4 in this case) and you keep doing this pattern until you are happy with the height of your hat (the more rounds you work, the longer your hat, and the slouchier it will be)!

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The look of cabling is so gorgeous and luxurious as it has such beautiful texture!

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Did you know that cabling could be achieved through crochet?  Once you get the hang of the pattern and how to work the different stitches, this project goes by quickly!

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Using 1 skein of yarn, I was able to go up to Round 19 which resulted in 6 cables.  My hat measured 10” or 25.5 cm including the band.  You could technically finish here if you want to only use one skein of yarn as I know sometimes it’s a hassle to buy another skein, especially if you are going to be using only a part of it.  However, I bought another skein since I wanted my beanie to be slightly longer and I wanted to add a pom pom too…

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I added another 3 rounds to make 7 cables in total, and my hat now measured 11.25” or 29 cm long.  You can keep going if you want your hat to be even slouchier!

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To seam up the top of the hat, I threaded yarn along the last round and pulled tightly to gather it together (similar to how I seamed up my “Easy Ribbed Pom Pom Beanie”).

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After tightly pulling, I was left with a small hole, so I simply sewed it shut. 

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As an alternative, you could also seam up the beanie by pinching the edges and single crocheting them together in a star formation (see video HERE).  I completely forgot about this method until I was re-reading my old “Urban Jungle Slouchy Beanie" post!

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Here is a close-up of the invisible seam!  It blends in so nicely and you would not notice it was there unless you were looking for it!

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I wanted to add a pom pom to this cabled slouchy beanie, and I was excited to put my new Clover Pom Pom maker to use (see my review and step-by-step tutorial on how to use it HERE).  I used the larger size to make the pom pom for my beanie!

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After attaching the pom pom, my “Cabled Slouchy Beanie" was complete!  Isn’t it beautiful?

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Here is the free pattern for my “Cabled Slouchy Beanie" (adult size)!  

Be warned that it looks complicated but once you get the hang of the technique and repetition, it goes by quickly.  Hopefully the step-by-step pictures above will help make the technical pattern easier to understand as well.  With that being said, this is not a beginner’s project as some crochet experience under your belt would greatly help!

Materials:

Special stitches:

  • Front Post Treble Crochet (Fptc)Yarn Over (YO) twice, insert hook from front to back around post of stitch indicated. YO and pull up a loop, [YO and draw through 2 loops on hook] 3 times.
  • Back Post Double Crochet (Bpdc): YO, insert hook behind post of stitch (insert hook from back to front of stitch), YO, pull up a loop, YO, (pull through 2 loops) twice.
  • Front Post Double Crochet (Fpdc): YO, insert hook behind post of stitch (insert hook from front to back of stitch), YO, pull up a loop, YO, (pull through 2 loops) twice. 

Ribbed Band:

Chain 10

R1: In back loops only, Sc 1 in second chain from hook and in each chain across (9 sc).

R2-75: Chain 1, turn.  In back loops only, Sc 1 in second chain from hook and in each chain across (9 sc).

My ribbed band measured 21.5” or 54 cm.  Adjust this number based on your own head size.  Fasten off and leave long end for sewing.  Sew short ends together to form ribbed band.  

Cabled Body:

***In each round, the Ch 2 does not count as a stitch.  When joining at the end of each round, join to the stitch indicated (NOT the Ch 2) to make an invisible seam.

Join yarn with sl st at any point around edge of band.

Round 1: Chain 2, work one double crochet in same st as Chain 2.  Work 71 dc as evenly as possible around edge of band.  Join with sl st to first dc (72 dc).  [If adapting the pattern, make sure your final number of dc’s is a multiple of 6.]  

R2: Chain 2, Bpdc around first dc from previous round (same dc you joined to from Round 1).  Bpdc around next st.  Work cabling: {Skip next two dc, 2 Fptc around next 2 dc.  Fptc around first skipped dc and next dc}.  *2 bpdc in next two st.  Work cabling: Sk next 2 st, 2 Fptc around next 2 st.  Fptc around first skipped st and next st.*, rep 11 times.  Join with sl st to first Bpdc.  (12 cables around with 12 sets of Bpdc’s between)

R3: Chain 2, Bpdc around first Bpdc from previous round.  Bpdc around next st.  Fpdc 4.  *Bpdc 2, Fpdc 4*, rep 11 times .  Join with sl st to first Bpdc.  (12 cables around with 12 sets of Bpdc’s between)

R4: Repeat Round 3.

With rounds 2-4, one set of cables is complete!  Keep repeating Rounds 2-4 until desired length.  

R5-7: same as Round 2-4

R8-10: same as Round 2-4

R11-13: same as Rounds 2-4

R14-16: same as Rounds 2-4

R17-19: same as Rounds 2-4

R20-22: same as Rounds 2-4

I completed 7 sets of cables with my beanie measuring 11.25” or 29 cm (including ribbed band).  Fasten off and leave long end for sewing.  Weave yarn through ends of last round, pull tightly and sew hole shut.  Alternatively, seam up beanie using this method HERE.

Optional: Add pom pom (I used my “Clover Pom Pom Maker”).  Attach pom pom to beanie and you are DONE!

****Important NoteIf you would like to adapt this pattern for a baby, child, teen, etc., please check out this very helpful post by Anne HERE that contains a chart with head circumference sizes (your ribbed band) as well as general hat height (the number of rounds or length of the beanie)! 

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Slouchy beanies have such a cool, effortless look, and they are the perfect fall and winter accessory!

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We enjoyed capturing the beautiful colours of fall with this photoshoot!  I’ve entered my third trimester now and I practically live in leggings and sweaters :)

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[Striped Tunic: Urban Outfitters, Cape Sweater: Aritzia, Boots: Steve Madden; Purse: Coach; Cabled Beanie: Me :D; Belt: Aldo Accessories; Gold Leather Bracelet Cuff: Mahina; Watch: Michael Kors]

I actually also crocheted a “Toddler Cabled Slouchy Beanie" for Myla!  This pattern is really simple to adjust for different sizes as you simply make the ribbed band your desired length and then work the cabled body (see general sizing chart HERE)!

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I adore matching with Myla, and she always loves being able to wear the same thing that I’m wearing too.  Our pom poms look so cute from behind!

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You can find the free pattern for Myla’s “Toddler Cabled Slouchy Beanie" HERE!  

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You can really see the gorgeous cabling in this photo below.  I love how you can make this beanie as slouchy as you want by simply adding more cables and rounds!

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There’s something about the beautiful and rich colours of fall and hearing the leaves crunch below you that makes this time of year very special.  Myla and I had fun examining the leaves together!

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We also had fun throwing the leaves too!  I love her expression with her furrowed brows!

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I am so glad I was able to design a cabled hat as that was something I had always wanted to do ever since making my “Cabled Wrist Warmers" and learning this new technique last year!  Crocheting is such a fun learning process as you try out new patterns, learn new techniques, and apply them to future projects.  I feel so thankful to have this blog where I can document these experiences and projects and share them with you all.  I know that many of you have been learning right alongside with me the whole time as we all grow together and cheer each other on :)  We are constantly encouraged by your support and kind words and have so much fun sharing our projects and patterns with you!

Enjoy learning this new technique and have fun making your own “Cabled Slouchy Beanies”!  The “Toddler Cabled Slouchy Beanie" can be found HERE so you can make matching beanies for your mini-me’s :)  I also actually worked up a “Chunky Cabled Slouchy Beanie" using super bulky (level 6) yarn, and I will share the pattern with you as well in the coming weeks!  Follow me on Facebook, Twitter (@AllAboutAmi) & Instagram (@AllAboutAmi) to get all my updates!  Enjoy this beautiful fall season 

Amazon Affiliate Links

Lion Brand Heartland Yarn Grand Canyon

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Sneak peek of upcoming new design: Cabled Slouchy Beanies (matching mommy and toddler set)!!!

Step-by-step blog post and free patterns coming next week!

I used the pom poms made with my “Clover Pom Pom Maker" for these beanies!  For those who want to get a head start, I used Lion Brand's Heartland yarn in “Grand Canyon" (1 skein for toddler hat, about 1 1/4 skeins for adult hat)!

Clover Pom Pom Maker

I’ve done my fair share of yarn pom pom making in the past as I love adding pom poms to hats (see my “Easy Ribbed Pom Pom Beanie" HERE) and we hung yarn pom poms from manzanita trees as decor for our baby shower two years ago (see HERE)!  We cut out two doughnut shapes out of cardboard to serve as our pom pom makers, and they were quite effective although the cardboard started to fray and become flimsy over time.  

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I was always intrigued by the plastic pom pom makers I had heard about and seen on-line, and I was delighted when I saw the Clover pom pom maker being sold at my local Michaels!  I’ve loved using my Clover Amour crochet hooks as well as my Clover stitch markers, so I was excited to try this particular Clover tool.  I waited for a 50% off coupon and managed to snatch the last pom pom maker two weekends ago- it’s about $10 regular price, so it was only $5 with the coupon.  Since you get two different sizes in one package, each pom pom maker came out to be only $2.50 which I thought was a great deal!  

I purchased the Large set seen below which makes pom poms with diameters of 2 1/2 inches/65 mm & 3 3/8 inches/85 mm.  The Small set makes pom poms with diameters of 1 3/8 inches/35 mm & 1 5/8 inches/45 mm.  On the package it says that “actual size will vary depending on type of yarn used and thickness”.  I knew the Large set was more appropriate for me since I would mostly be making poms poms for hats!

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The back of the package includes some instructions on how to use the pom pom maker, but I did not find them very comprehensive or thorough.  I later discovered that there are more in-depth instructions on the inside of this package, but by then I had already found out how to use the Clover pom pom maker by finding a very helpful video on-line (I’ll link to it at the end of this blog post)!  I thought I would show you some step-by-step photos of how to use this pom pom maker as you might be interested in how it works too :)

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These are the two pom pom makers that come inside the package.  I love the bright, vibrant colours!

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The two arches of the pom pom maker can swing apart like so…

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You begin winding the yarn around one arch starting from the left side and moving towards the right.

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Be sure to hold the arches tightly together so that they’re aligned (both top and bottom arches are comprised of two separate arches that are side-by-side).  

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When you’re winding the yarn, you want to make sure that absolutely no colour is visible (i.e. the blue of the arches).  How much yarn you wind around the arches will determine the thickness and fullness of your pom pom!  Once I hit the right side, I actually wind more yarn by going towards the left side and then go back towards the right side again (going across arch three times).

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After all the yarn winding, you want to end with the strand pointing towards the right side…

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You then feed the yarn through the gap between the two top arches and two bottom arches.  

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Next you begin winding the yarn around the two bottom arches.  This little piece of yarn that is connecting the top and bottom arches will be cut later on!

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Time for some more winding!

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Once you’ve wound enough yarn on the bottom arches (I also did it three times), you can cut off the yarn.

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You push the arches together and then get a pair of sharp scissors ready!

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You place your scissors in the gap between the arches and begin cutting…

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This cutting is a very smooth process as the groove between the arches helps guide your scissors and the yarn begins to splay towards each side.

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Once your scissors have made its way around the entire circle, you are left with this!

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Here is a picture showing the top view and the groove that your scissors are supposed to follow.  This picture made me think of a macaron…random I know…

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Next you cut a long piece of yarn and thread it through the groove.  You will be using this strand to tie a knot to secure your pom pom.  I always make this strand extra long since I use it to attach the pom pom to my hats as well!

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Be sure to tie your knots very tightly as you do not want your pom pom to fall part!  I tie a double knot on one side, then swing the ends towards the opposite end and tie a double knot on the other side as well.  

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Then you are ready to take the top and bottom parts apart to release your pom pom!

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Almost there!

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Then you fluff and shape your pom pom to its desired shape.  You trim the long pieces with a pair of scissors.  I find that with using this pom pom maker, not much trimming and shaping is needed (especially compared to my previous cardboard template method).

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Here is my finished product!  I kind of wish that I had done more winding to make an even fuller pom pom. This was only my third pom pom made using this Clover pom pom maker, so I am still learning.  When in doubt, just wind some more as a fuller pom pom is better than a limp pom pom!

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Here are the two pom poms I made using the two sizes included in the “Large Clover Pom Pom Maker" package.  If you’re wondering what this beautiful yarn is, it’s Lion Brand’s "Heartland" yarn in "Grand Canyon”.  This yarn is incredibly soft and this particular colour is gorgeous as it has a beautiful sheen to it with hints of browns, greys and golds in it.  I will actually be blogging about a new design I made using this yarn shortly, and it includes these two pom poms!  Be on the look out for a sneak peek of it later this week!

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Here is a comparison of using a medium (level 4) yarn versus a super bulky (level 6) yarn with the largest pom pom maker!  The finished pom pom definitely depends on the type and thickness of the yarn.  

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This is the helpful video that I followed when I was learning how to use my new Clover pom pom maker!  Watch it below to see all this in action!

Here are some other beautiful ways in which you can use yarn pom poms besides attaching them to hats!  Liz of “Say Yes" made this gorgeous pom pom rug that looks so fluffy and soft on the feet!  Check out her tutorial on how to make this HERE.  Michelle of “MollyMoo" made these adorable pom pom hedgehogs using the large Clover pom pom maker with different yarn colours and some clever trimming, shaping and felt.  Check out her tutorial HERE.

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I had a lot of fun learning how to use my new pom pom maker and I am so glad that I made this purchase.  It was a great deal, and I know that I will be putting this to good use in the future!  I shared my purchase on Instagram and was delighted to hear that many of you have also had great experiences with the Clover Pom Pom Maker and were very enthusiastic about it too!  It’s a great tool that helps facilitate the pom pom making process, and I would definitely recommend it to other crafters.  You can actually purchase the Clover Pom Pom Maker on Amazon (Large set on sale for $5.41 HERE and Small set on sale for $6.82 HERE)! I hope you found this blog post informative and helpful, and I wish you happy pom pom making!

Amazon affiliate linksClover Large Pom Pom Maker

My yarn storage solution was featured in the August 2014 issue of Australia’s “Homespun Magazine”!  I’m so honoured that my work has been featured a second time in this beautiful magazine (see my amigurumi Siu Mai's feature in the July issue HERE), and I hope that seeing my yarn shelf in this magazine helped inspire some people to create their own!  If you haven’t already read about how I organized my growing yarn collection using corrugated plastic dividers, read the full blog post HERE!  Thanks for the lovely feature, Homespun (click on the photo to enlarge it and read the text for my “Do-It-Yourself Diamond Storage”!

Do you remember the “Easy Ribbed Pom Pom Beanie" I made last year?  I loved the pattern so much that I ended up making one for my sister Ashley and my brother Corey too!  I started making Corey’s beanie towards the end of last year’s winter, and I actually never ended up finishing it….but with fall approaching, I wanted Corey to be able to wear his beanie as soon as possible, so I finally completed it just recently!

Sometimes it can be hard finding crochet patterns for men, but this “Easy Ribbed Pom Pom Pom Beanie" looks great on guys too!  I followed the exact same pattern that I used for my white beanie HERE to make Corey’s.  I used "Loops & Threads Ring Spun" in Purple.  So if you’ve been wanting to crochet a beanie for your boyfriend/husband/brother/dad, give this pattern a go!  It’s very simple and a great project for beginners!  Doesn’t it look so awesome and stylish on Corey?  Click on each photo to expand them!

Easy Chunky Crochet Sweater

I’ve always wanted to try crocheting some sort of clothing piece that I could wear as I’ve previously made a lot of accessories such as cowls and hats.  I dabbled in sweater-making with Myla’s “Arbor Baby Sweater" but up till now, I could not find a crocheted sweater pattern for adults that I absolutely loved.  Furthermore, I didn’t feel confident enough to try making my own design since I had no previous experience working on an adult sweater.  

Much to my delight, I saw a picture of a gorgeous sweater that draped beautifully on-line, and it turned out to be a free crochet pattern on the Lion Brand Yarns website called the “Simple Crochet Shrug" (see HERE).  When I quickly read through the pattern, I was blown away by its simplicity as the construction was simply one massive rectangle folded in half and then seamed along the sides while leaving arm holes- no other attachments were necessary!  It was a very popular pattern as over 600 people had made this project on Ravelry, and I couldn’t wait to give this sweater a try!

Picking out the colour and yarn I wanted for my sweater was tricky, but eventually we decided upon Bernat’s Softee Chunky in “Grey Ragg”.  It is a very soft yarn that does not fuzz up too easily and I absolutely loved the light grey and white variegation that I knew would give my sweater a beautiful look.  It’s a super bulky (level 6) yarn that has a net weight of 100 g/3.5 oz and approximately 99 m/108 yds.  In total, I used five skeins of this yarn.  Each skein regularly costs $4.99 (Canadian) and with the Michael’s 40% off coupon, each skein came out to $2.99, so the cost of materials for this sweater was very affordable.  You can also find this yarn on Amazon HERE for only $2.74!

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I read through almost all the Ravelry entries of this project to see how other people’s sweaters turned out depending on how many chains they started with, what yarn they used and any other modifications they made.  It was a challenge determining the size as some people’s sweaters turned out too long or too short, and it was hard to judge how tall these people were in their photos.  I wanted to make my sweater oversized and long enough to cover my rear, and I actually ended up making my sweater WAYY too big on the first try.  Sweaters stretch a lot and I decided to frog my work and start over so that I could try and make it the perfect size on the second try!  

I chained 76 using my 10 mm crochet hook.  It is VERY important to note that this initial series of chain stitches will be the LENGTH of your sweater, so determining this initial length is key as you will not be able to change it later on (unless you add some edging at the end).  The rows worked later on will be the width of your sweater.  Do keep in mind that your sweater can stretch later on as you pull it downwards too.  For reference, I am about 5’ 6” tall.  

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To achieve the beautiful ribbing of this sweater, you work single crochets in the back loops only.  As a reminder, the back loops are the loops further away from you while the front loops are the ones closer to you when you’re crocheting.

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You crochet row by row in the back loops only, turning your work as you go.  How simple can this pattern be?  It’s the perfect project to work on when you’re watching tv or having a conversation since you don’t need to keep the count and it works up so quickly since you’re using chunky yarn and such a large crochet hook.  Doesn’t the ribbing give such beautiful texture?

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You keep adding rows until you are happy with the width of your sweater.  In the end, I ended up with 56 rows measuring 31”/79 cm across.  Lengthwise, my rectangle was 38.5”/98 cm (remember that this is capable of stretching quite a bit too).

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Next, you fold the rectangle in half.  It is very important that you fold your rectangle in half so that the rows are running vertically!  I noticed that quite a few people on Ravelry were folding their rectangles the wrong way as their rows were running horizontally.  This meant that their resulting sweaters were very wide and short!

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To create the arm holes, you seam up the sides.

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I seamed up 11”/28 cm and left 8”/20 cm for the arm hole on each side.

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This is how you wear the piece- now it’s looking more sweater-like :)  You’ll notice that the the rows now run horizontally in the front but vertically in the back.  When I was working on this piece and periodically measuring it to my body to check for size, it seemed as though it might end up being too short.  However, we learned from our first experience, and we knew that it was capable of stretching a lot later on.  Thus, don’t be too worried if you think your sweater seems it might be a tad short…

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I wanted to add my own modification to this sweater pattern by adding a special ribbed collar.  To do so, I located the midline of the sweater and attached a stitch marker (you can’t see it too well in the picture below, but there is a peach stitch marker where the midline arrow is pointing to).  Next, I wore the sweater and determined where I wanted the collar to start. I placed a green stitch marker 12 rows below the arm seam on either side (this will vary depending on your height and where you want your own collar to start).  In case you’re interested, I have been using my “Clover Lock Ring Markers" a lot for all my recent projects, and none of them have broken on me (buy them HERE)!

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Starting from the green stitch marker on the left side (when you’re looking at the sweater) and crocheting upwards towards the peach marker, I worked some slip stitches, single crochets, half double crochets and then double crochets in Row 1.  This helped to slowly build up the collar and make it taper towards the ends.  I did the exact same pattern back downwards to the other green stitch marker once I reached the midline at the top to make it symmetrical.  I used a smaller 8 mm crochet hook for this collar part to get tighter, smaller stitches compared to those of the body.  I also tried to pick up stitches quite close together so that there were no gaps in the collar.

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Row 1 is complete!

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Next I alternated front post double crochets with back post double crochets in Row 2 to begin creating a ribbed effect.  

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I did the same thing for Rows 3 and 4 to really emphasize the ribbing.

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The ribbed collar is complete!

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You can fold the collar up…

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And the ribbing is on the other side too :)  I think this ribbed collar is a really nice addition, don’t you?  I’m really happy with how it turned out!

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Here is the pattern for the collar that I added in case you’re interested in crocheting one for your sweater too!

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To access the free Lion Brand pattern for their “Simple Crochet Shrug”, click HERE.  They have also written up patterns for the same shrug using different weights of yarn (e.g. worsted, bulky, super bulky), so see a list of them HERE towards the bottom under “Also available in other Lion Brand yarns" to get an idea of what numbers you should use for your particular yarn.

In summary for my own sweater, I chained 76 initially and did 56 rows of single crochets.  I used a 10 mm crochet hook for the body of the sweater and 5 skeins of yarn.  Keep in mind that these numbers will vary for yourself depending on how long and wide you want your sweater to be (and depending on your height), what hook size and yarn you use (worsted, bulky, super bulky) and how tightly you crochet (smaller, tighter stitches will result in your sweater stretching less while loose stitches will result in more stretching).

Collar Pattern:

- Tag upper midline with stitch marker.

- Tag sides with stitch markers indicating where you want your collar to begin and end (12 rows below arm seam for mine).

{Sl st = slip stitch, Sc = single crochet, Hdc = half double crochet, Fpdc = front post double crochet, Bpdc = back post double crochet (learn how to do Fpdc’s HERE and Bpdc’s HERE)}

Using 8 mm hook,

R1: Sl st 2, Sc 2, Hdc 2, Dc 57 (or however many it takes for you to reach stitch marker at upper midline- space your stitches close together so that there are no gaps). Dc at stitch marker.  Repeat exact same pattern down the other way to your stitch marker: Dc 57, Hdc 2, Sc 2, Sl st 2.  Slip stitch to next stitch, turn. 

R2: Sl st 2, Sc 2, Hdc 2, alternate fpdc and bpdc around (i.e. start with fpdc, bpdc, fpdc, bpdc, etc) until 6 stitches left.  Hdc 2, sc 2, sl st 2. Slip stitch to next stitch, turn.

R3: Same as R2 but alternate bpdc with fpdc (i.e. start with bpdc, fpdc, bpdc, fpdc, etc) to ensure that ribbing is building up.

R4: Same as R2.

Fasten off and weave in ends.

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I was incredibly excited to try on my new sweater and we took advantage of the last days of summer weather to do a photoshoot before the snow comes!  This sweater is so versatile as it looks cute over a dress, and I can see myself wearing this in the winter with leggings and tall boots too!

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I’ll be able to wear this as my pregnant belly continues to grow as I enter my third trimester soon- oversized cardigans and sweaters are a must as winter and sweater weather rolls around!  I practically lived in my nursing tank tops with blazers and cardigans over top when I was nursing Myla (see my Maternity Fashion HERE and my Nursing Fashion HERE), so I know I’ll be wearing this sweater a lot post partum, especially since we’re having a winter baby.

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I’m really happy with how the sizing of the sweater turned out as the length is not too long or too short.  The ginormous sweater I made on my first try (I chained 100 and did 68 rows) made me look like I was being engulfed in a blanket as it extended down towards my calves!  

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The vertical ribbing looks beautiful from behind.  This sweater is so incredibly luxurious and romantic…

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This sweater does tend to bunch around the bum area a bit due to its construction, but it’s not a big deal…

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Popping up my ribbed collar!  If you don’t want to add this special collar or you think it might be too difficult, you could always simply crochet more rows when working on your big rectangle to increase its width.  The piece will naturally fold to give a collar if it’s wide enough.  

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You could also add some buttons to this sweater if you wanted some closure!  I myself love how it hangs and drapes naturally when I wear it. Another modification you could try is adding sleeves by crocheting around the armholes too!

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[Dress: Urban Outfitters, Boots: Steve Madden; Purse: Coach; Sweater: Me :D; Bracelet: Mikaylove; Necklace: Mahina; Watch: Michael Kors]

I know people tend to whip out their crochet hooks as temperatures drop and fall and winter begin, so this is the perfect project to work on!  Sweater weather will soon be upon us, and it is actually currently snowing where I live as I write this post (ahh, the fleeting days of summer).  This sweater is so incredibly simple to crochet and the results are gorgeous, like something you would see in a high end fashion boutique.  It’s a great beginner’s project, and it’s such an amazing feeling being able to wear something you created with your own two hands from scratch (I love seeing the looks on people’s faces when they discover that I made my crocheted pieces)!  Let me know what you think of this sweater in the comments below, if you’ll be trying out this design, and if you’ve come across any other sweater patterns that you’ve loved.  If you do end up making your own sweater, I think it’d be really helpful to leave a comment below letting us know what yarn you used and how many chains and rows you ended up going with too :)

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Here are some of my previous winter crochet projects in case you’re interested in crocheting some hats and cowls while you’re at it!  From left to right and top to bottom we have the Easy Ribbed Pom Pom Beanie, Knotted Headband, Puff Stitch Cowl, Buttoned Shell Stitch Cowl, Long Double Crochet Cowl, and Urban Jungle Slouchy Beanie.  The “Easy Ribbed Pom Pom Beanie" has a similar construction to this sweater and is a great beginner’s project!  Don’t forget to keep up with me on my Facebook, Twitter and Instagram as I’m putting the final touches on a lot of new designs and projects.  I’ve been on a crocheting frenzy as I try and bring to life all the designs swirling in my mind before Baby #2 comes and life gets extremely busy!  Enjoy making your own beautiful sweaters and let me know how it goes!

Sneak peek of upcoming blog post & step-by-step tutorial: Easy Chunky Crochet Sweater

Sneak peek of upcoming blog post & step-by-step tutorial: Easy Chunky Crochet Sweater

The winner of the “Freshly Picked" moccasins is Amanda Z.!  Congratulations, Amanda :)  Look for my e-mail so you can tell me what colour and size moccasins you would like!
Thank you so much to all those who entered!  I enjoy sharing about products I love on the blog and I’m glad that I can partner with these artisans and entrepreneurs to bring you these giveaways!

The winner of the “Freshly Picked" moccasins is Amanda Z.!  Congratulations, Amanda :)  Look for my e-mail so you can tell me what colour and size moccasins you would like!

Thank you so much to all those who entered!  I enjoy sharing about products I love on the blog and I’m glad that I can partner with these artisans and entrepreneurs to bring you these giveaways!

Freshly Picked Moccasins Review & GIVEAWAY

I love supporting handmade artisans and moms who have started their own small businesses.  It takes a lot of work, dedication and patience to design your unique product, find your niche market, get your name out there, and hope that your work will be well-received!  

Susan Petersen is one such mom who decided to make and sell her own baby moccasins when she couldn’t find any well-designed, soft-soled shoes for her son.  After using some scrap leather from a yard sale to design a prototype that she was happy with, she decided to start her own company called "Freshly Picked" in 2009. 

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However, Susan was on a very limited budget, so she got creative when figuring out how to earn the money to start her business.  Her brother let her keep the old windows from his window installation business, and she spent the whole summer banging the glass out of these windows in order to recycle the aluminum frames.  With the $200 made from recycling the frames, she started “Freshly Picked”!  

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Fast forward five years and six design changes later, Susan has nurtured “Freshly Picked” into a thriving company that is an inspiration to so many.  She has appeared on “Shark Tank”, has been embraced by celebrities (and their children), and has amassed a huge following as her moccasins are seen as the crème de la crème of handmade baby moccasins (her Instagram account has over 230,000 followers).  After experiencing such success, Susan loves giving back and encouraging others through her “Entreneur Empowerment Movement" on Instagram and also providing scholarships for business start-ups.

Susan’s team over at “Freshly Picked" sent over some moccasins for Myla so that I could review them, and as you can see in the pics above, they come in this modern dust bag!

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"Freshly Picked" moccasins come in a wide array of exquisite colours (see here), and some of my favourites include blush, platinum and gold.  We decided to get the “Weathered Brown" for Myla since it is such a versatile, classic, gender-neutral colour that will match with anything!

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These moccasins are made of extremely soft and supple leather, and the elastic opening ensures that they will not fall off as baby shoes often do.  The fringe along the front, sides and back is a really cute touch, and the bottoms are stamped with the “FP” logo!  There is no discernible left and right moccasin from the start (the same sewing pattern is used for both feet), but each moccasin quickly molds to the child’s feet and it is then easy to tell which one is right and left based on how it curves.

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With the rise in popularity of “Freshly Picked”, these moccasins are now priced at $60.  I admit that it is a hefty price for baby/toddler shoes but clearly there is a market for it and Susan wrote a very good article entitled “Why You Should Raise Your Prices" (see HERE) directed to handmade artists.  In this article, Susan discusses how you must value what you are making and very carefully decide how much your time and talent is worth, particularly if you are trying to make a living from your art.  I respect Susan’s business model and her pricing and how far she has taken her company.  Susan now focuses on other tasks, and when I asked, I was told that all the seamstresses, suppliers and vendors are in the United States.

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Myla absolutely ADORES her moccasins as they are hands down her favourite pair of shoes.  She has worn them almost exclusively for the past five months and I love how they never fall off or get lost!  Here we are at a local Farmer’s Market at the beginning of the summer…

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These moccs are very comfortable for Myla as they are flexible, soft, and have plenty of grip.  They come in sizes 1-10 (for pre-walkers and walkers) and you can check out the sizing chart HERE!  

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On our recent trip to California, Myla pretty much wore them everyday!  They are so versatile as they look cute with both leggings and dresses.  I love the look of the fringe from behind :)

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I can’t tell you how many times we’ve received compliments from strangers when they gaze down and see the cute moccasins that Myla is wearing!

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Here are some photos of our little sweetheart’s first trip to Disneyland!  I love matching with my little girl 

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This is one of my favourite photos from the whole trip: Myla dancing in front of the Sleeping Beauty Castle in Disneyland with that childhood freedom and innocence without a care in the world!

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You can see that Myla has really worn her moccasins down in our pregnancy announcement below from a month ago (I can’t believe I’m already 25 weeks pregnant now!).  The “FP” logo stamped on the bottom is actually completely gone, but the moccasins have held up well with no rips or holes.  They continue to look good even though they have worn down as our “Weathered Brown” choice now has a real weathered and vintage look!  I wouldn’t hesitate to get a pair of these moccasins for our next baby after seeing the quality first hand and how much wear Myla has gotten out of her favourite shoes!

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And now the exciting part…Susan and her team at “Freshly Picked” have generously offered a GIVEAWAY!  The lucky winner will get to choose one pair of “Freshly Picked” moccasins in any colour and size!   You can enter this giveaway using the Rafflecopter widget below, and there are 10 different ways to enter- none of them are mandatory, but of course the more entries you have, the higher chances you have of winning!  This contest is only open to residents of the US and Canada due to shipping costs (sorry to readers from other countries!).  Also, you are not eligible to enter if you’ve won a pair of Freshly Picked moccasins in the last 60 days.  Take a look at all the different moccasins available HERE and have fun entering below- good luck :)

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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