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Chunky Cabled Slouchy Beanie

Two weeks ago I blogged about the “Cabled Slouchy Beanies" that I designed and crocheted for Myla and I.  Thank you so much for all the warm feedback you’ve given me about that pattern, and I’m delighted to hear that you found my step-by-step tutorial easy to follow and understand!  Cabling in crochet really isn’t that difficult once you get the hang of it, and I’m glad that you’ve enjoyed learning this new technique and making cabled beanies of your own!

Before crocheting those beanies using worsted weight yarn, I actually started off by crocheting a “Chunky Cabled Slouchy Beanie" using super bulky yarn!  I had always wanted to make a super chunky beanie, and I wanted to try the cabling technique I had learned from my “Cabled Wrist Warmers" with this hat.  I loved this gorgeous mustard yellow yarn called "Goldenrod" in "Loops & Threads Cozy Wool”.  I needed about 2 skeins of this yarn to make this beanie (including the pom pom with some yarn left over).

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This beanie is constructed the exact same way as the “Cabled Slouchy Beanie”!  Of course, the numbers are very different since you are using super bulky yarn (level 6) versus worsted weight yarn (level 4).  You start off by crocheting the ribbed band!  I used a 10 mm hook with this project, and I must warn you that my beanie ended up stretching A LOT!  Thus, I would recommend trying to adjust for this by either making your ribbed band smaller than you think it should be or perhaps using a smaller crochet hook (maybe an 8 or 9 mm).

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You then work double crochets around the edge of the band, and then begin your cabling in the subsequent rounds.  Please refer to the very detailed step-by-step pictures and instructions I wrote up regarding cabling HERE in my “Cabled Slouchy Beanie" post!  The technique is exactly the same!

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I ended up doing 4 sets of chunky cables!  Don’t the cables look so plump and textured?  I was curious what more delicate cables would look like after making this beanie, which is why I made the other beanies with worsted weight yarn for Myla and I!

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After closing up the top of the beanie…

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I then used my “Clover Pom Pom Maker" to make a super fluffy yellow pom pom using the super bulky yarn!  You can read my review about this awesome pom pom maker tool HERE :)

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After attaching the pom pom, this was my finished “Chunky Cabled Slouchy Beanie”!  Doesn’t it look so warm and soft?

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Here is the free pattern for my “Chunky Cabled Slouchy Beanie”!

This is not a beginner’s project as some previous crochet experience would help!  PLEASE refer to the step-by-step pictures found HERE in order to make this technical pattern easier to understand!

Materials:

  • 10 mm crochet hook (or 8-9 mm hook- see important note below)
  • Super bulky yarn, level 6 (I used Loops & Threads Cozy Wool in “Goldenrod”, 2 skeins)
  • Optional: yarn needle to seam up beanie; Clover Pom Pom Maker

Special stitches:

  • Front Post Treble Crochet (Fptc)Yarn Over (YO) twice, insert hook from front to back around post of stitch indicated. YO and pull up a loop, [YO and draw through 2 loops on hook] 3 times.
  • Back Post Double Crochet (Bpdc): YO, insert hook behind post of stitch (insert hook from back to front of stitch), YO, pull up a loop, YO, (pull through 2 loops) twice.
  • Front Post Double Crochet (Fpdc): YO, insert hook behind post of stitch (insert hook from front to back of stitch), YO, pull up a loop, YO, (pull through 2 loops) twice. 

Ribbed Band:

Chain 6

R1: In back loops only, Sc 1 in second chain from hook and in each chain across (5 sc).

R2-30: Chain 1, turn.  In back loops only, Sc 1 in second chain from hook and in each chain across (5 sc).

My ribbed band measured 18” or 45 cm.  Adjust this number based on your own head size.  Keep in mind that this band is capable of stretching a lot since we are working with super bulky yarn and a large crochet hook.  Fasten off and leave long end for sewing.  Sew short ends together to form ribbed band.  

Cabled Body:

***In each round, the Ch 2 does not count as a stitch.  When joining at the end of each round, join to the stitch indicated (NOT the Ch 2) to make an invisible seam.

Join yarn with sl st at any point around edge of band.

Round 1: Chain 2, work one double crochet in same st as Chain 2.  Work 29 dc as evenly as possible around edge of band.  Join with sl st to first dc (30 dc).  [If adapting the pattern, make sure your final number of dc’s is a multiple of 6.]  

R2: Chain 2, Bpdc around first dc from previous round (same dc you joined to from Round 1).  Bpdc around next st.  Work cabling: {Skip next two dc, 2 Fptc around next 2 dc.  Fptc around first skipped dc and next dc}.  *2 bpdc in next two st.  Work cabling: Sk next 2 st, 2 Fptc around next 2 st.  Fptc around first skipped st and next st.*, rep 4 times.  Join with sl st to first Bpdc.  (5 cables around with 5 sets of Bpdc’s between)

R3: Chain 2, Bpdc around first Bpdc from previous round.  Bpdc around next st.  Fpdc 4.  *Bpdc 2, Fpdc 4*, rep 4 times .  Join with sl st to first Bpdc.  (5 cables around with 5 sets of Bpdc’s between)

R4: Repeat Round 3.

With rounds 2-4, one set of cables is complete!  Keep repeating Rounds 2-4 until desired length.  

R5-7: same as Round 2-4

R8-10: same as Round 2-4

R11-13: same as Rounds 2-4

I completed 4 sets of cables with my beanie measuring 11.25” or 29 cm (including ribbed band).  Fasten off and leave long end for sewing.  Weave yarn through ends of last round, pull tightly and sew hole shut.  Alternatively, seam up beanie using this method HERE.

Optional: Add pom pom (I used my “Clover Pom Pom Maker”).  Attach pom pom to beanie and you are DONE!

****IMPORTANT NOTES:

  • Because of the chunkiness of this yarn and the large 10 mm crochet hook used, my beanie ended up stretching A LOT!  Please keep this in mind as you may want to make this beanie smaller so that it has room to stretch later on.  You could do this by making your ribbed band shorter or by using a smaller crochet hook (8 or 9 mm)!
  • Adding the pom pom to this hat makes it somewhat back heavy as this hat tends to slide off my head (this is probably also due to the fact that it has stretched quite a bit).  You could omit the pom pom, make it less slouchy (by doing fewer rounds) or also make the ribbed band wider (i.e. chain more than 6 in the beginning).  I have a larger-than-average head, so if this hat ended up being too big for me, it might be too big for you.  It actually fits Ryan comfortably now!  Please adapt this pattern as you see fit!

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This beanie is very warm, and I love the chunky look of it!  As you can see in the picture below, this beanie does stretch quite a bit, particularly in the back double crochet part between the cables….

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Cuddling with my little cutie!  I really adore this golden yellow colour- it’s so perfect for fall and will add a nice pop of colour to my winter wardrobe :)

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[Striped Tunic: Urban Outfitters, Jacket: Aritzia, Boots: Steve Madden; Chunky Cabled Beanie: Me :D; Belt: Aldo Accessories; Gold Leather Bracelet Cuff: Mahina; Watch: Michael Kors]

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Here are my Cabled Beanies altogether :)  Using the worsted weight yarn definitely has a more delicate look as you can see the cables better.  The chunky super bulky yarn gives a lot of texture and a puffier look, and it works up extremely quickly since you are working with such a large crochet hook and chunk yarn!  I love how this pattern can be easily adapted for different yarns and for different head sizes!  Check out this helpful chart HERE to reference hat circumference and hat height measurements for different age groups.  Once again, my “Cabled Slouchy Beanie" for adults using worsted weight yarn can be found HERE while the toddler version can be found HERE!

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I hope you enjoyed this series of blog posts about cabling!  I really enjoyed learning this technique and introducing it to you all, and I hope you have fun making your own beanies using all different types of yarn for yourself, your friends and your family :)  Stay tuned for some cowls and scarves coming your way- what better way to keep warm this fall and winter than in your own handmade and crocheted creations?

Sneak peek of upcoming blog post & free pattern: Chunky Cabled Slouchy Beanie

Sneak peek of upcoming blog post & free pattern: Chunky Cabled Slouchy Beanie

If isn’t obvious from the photoset above, we are expecting a GIRL!!!  We were excited either way, and now we know that Myla will have a little sister to grow up with!  The bond between sisters is so special, and we are overjoyed to soon have two sweet little girls in our family and to share our lives with 

I wanted to crochet some new items for Baby Girl #2 as I didn’t want the poor girl to have to wear all of Myla’s hand-me-downs!  I was ecstatic to find a free pattern for these “Double Strapped Baby Mary Janes" on ChiWei’s blog "One Dog Woof”!  They are absolutely adorable, and I love how they are quick to work up and really help with yarn stash busting since each pair uses such little yarn :)

I crocheted some pairs for our friends who were recently blessed with baby girls too!  Click on each photo above to enlarge it for a better view!  It was fun choosing the yarn colour combinations for each pair, and I love the look of wooden buttons as closure.  The criss-cross straps make it hard for baby to yank these off as well ;)  It’s fun adding a pop of colour when attaching the wooden buttons with embroidery floss too.

I used all different types of yarn that were in my stash, including Lion Brand Vanna’s Choice (grey and pink pair), Loops & Threads Impeccable (red and beige pair) and Patons Canadiana (white and tan pair).  Each pair turned out a slightly different size since each yarn has a different thickness (even though they are all worsted weight yarn).  The red pair held its shape the best and turned out larger and sturdier.  Keep this in mind if you are trying to adjust for size!

We cannot wait to see some chubby little feet wearing these ❤  Once again, you can find the free pattern to make these baby Mary Janes on ChiWei’s blog HERE!

Toddler Cabled Slouchy Beanie

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Here is the free pattern for the “Toddler Cabled Slouchy Beanie" that I made for my daughter Myla to match the adult one that I made for myself!

***PLEASE follow along with the step-by-step post HERE as I showed how to work the cabling in detail with plenty of photos :)

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Materials:

  • 4 mm crochet hook (I used this to achieve smaller, more delicate cables compared to my adult beanie- you can choose to use either a 4 or 5 mm hook and adjust numbers as necessary)
  • Medium worsted weight yarn (I used Lion Brand’s Heartland in “Grand Canyon”, 1 skein)
  • Optional: yarn needle to seam up beanie; Clover Pom Pom Maker

Special stitches:

  • Front Post Treble Crochet (Fptc): Yarn Over (YO) twice, insert hook from front to back around post of stitch indicated. YO and pull up a loop, [YO and draw through 2 loops on hook] 3 times.
  • Back Post Double Crochet (Bpdc): YO, insert hook behind post of stitch (insert hook from back to front of stitch), YO, pull up a loop, YO, (pull through 2 loops) twice.
  • Front Post Double Crochet (Fpdc): YO, insert hook behind post of stitch (insert hook from front to back of stitch), YO, pull up a loop, YO, (pull through 2 loops) twice. 

Ribbed Band:

Chain 7

R1: In back loops only, Sc 1 in second chain from hook and in each chain across (6 sc).

R2-67: Chain 1, turn.  In back loops only, Sc 1 in second chain from hook and in each chain across (6 sc).

My ribbed band measured 16.5” or 40.5 cm.  Adjust this number based on desired size.  Fasten off and leave long end for sewing.  Sew short ends together to form ribbed band.  

Cabled Body:

***In each round, the Ch 2 does not count as a stitch.  When joining at the end of each round, join to the stitch indicated (NOT the Ch 2) to make an invisible seam.

Join yarn with sl st at any point around edge of band.

Round 1: Chain 2, work one double crochet in same st as Chain 2.  Work 65 dc as evenly as possible around edge of band.  Join with sl st to first dc (66 dc).  [If adapting the pattern, make sure your final number of dc’s is a multiple of 6.]  

R2: Chain 2, Bpdc around first dc from previous round (same dc you joined to from Round 1).  Bpdc around next st.  Work cabling: {Skip next two dc, 2 Fptc around next 2 dc.  Fptc around first skipped dc and next dc}.  *2 bpdc in next two st.  Work cabling: Sk next 2 st, 2 Fptc around next 2 st.  Fptc around first skipped st and next st.*, rep 11 times.  Join with sl st to first Bpdc.  (11 cables around with 11 sets of Bpdc’s between)

R3: Chain 2, Bpdc around first Bpdc from previous round.  Bpdc around next st.  Fpdc 4.  *Bpdc 2, Fpdc 4*, rep 11 times .  Join with sl st to first Bpdc.  (11 cables around with 11 sets of Bpdc’s between)

R4: Repeat Round 3.

With rounds 2-4, one set of cables is complete!  Keep repeating Rounds 2-4 until desired length.  

R5-7: same as Round 2-4

R8-10: same as Round 2-4

R11-13: same as Rounds 2-4

R14-16: same as Rounds 2-4

R17-19: same as Rounds 2-4

R20-22: same as Rounds 2-4

I completed 7 sets of cables with this beanie measuring 9” or 22 cm (including ribbed band).  Fasten off and leave long end for sewing.  Weave yarn through ends of last round, pull tightly and sew hole shut.  Alternatively, seam up beanie using this method HERE.

Optional: Add pom pom (I used my “Clover Pom Pom Maker”).  Attach pom pom to beanie and you are DONE!

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If you would like to adapt this pattern for a baby, child, teen, etc., please check out this very helpful post by Anne HERE that contains a chart with head circumference sizes (your ribbed band) as well as general hat height (the number of rounds or length of the beanie)! 

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This toddler version is such a cute accompaniment to my adult “Cabled Slouchy Beanie”!  Don’t forget to check out the step-by-step blog post and free pattern to the adult beanie HERE

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Enjoy matching with your mini-me’s!  These “Cabled Slouchy Beanies" are really perfect for the fall and winter and would make great gifts for mommies, daddies, and their little ones!

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I also made a “Chunky Crocheted Slouchy Beanie" for another variation using super bulky (level 6) yarn- you can find the free pattern HERE!  Keep up with all my updates on FacebookTwitter (@AllAboutAmi) & Instagram (@AllAboutAmi)!   Happy cabling!  ❤

Amazon Affiliate Links

Lion Brand Heartland Yarn Grand Canyon 

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Cabled Slouchy Beanie

I love learning new crochet techniques, whether it be “The Invisible Decrease" for amigurumi or how to create a ribbed effect for sweaters.  Last year, I discovered that the beautiful look of cabling could be achieved through crochet (not just through knitting!) when I followed Julee Reeves’ free pattern to make these gorgeous cabled wrist warmers pictured below (I blogged about them HERE).  I vowed that I would apply this new cabling technique I learned for future projects, and in last year’s blog post, I even mentioned that I might try and make a cabled hat!  Here we are today, and I am excited to show you the “Cabled Slouchy Beanie" that I designed! 

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I used Lion Brand’s “Heartland" yarn in "Grand Canyon which is a medium worsted weight (level 4) yarn.  It’s a taupe and grey blend with hints of gold that is incredibly soft with a beautiful sheen to it- so perfect for fall!  I used a 5 mm crochet hook with this yarn to make my cabled beanie.

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I started off by crocheting a ribbed band, similar to the ribbed band of the “Urban Jungle Slouchy Beanie”.  I chained 10 and then worked single crochets in the back loops only to create the ribbed effect.  The back loops are the loops that are further away from you as pictured below.

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The ribbed band is starting to build up…

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After 75 rows, my band measured about 21.5” or 54 cm.  You can measure your own head and adjust this number as necessary- keep in mind that this band will stretch over time with repeated wears!

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Next up, I sewed the short ends together to form the ribbed band!  As a warning, this pattern is not for beginners as it is more technical and uses more complicated crochet stitches.  I tried to be as detailed as possible with this next series of photos and with the pattern instructions- they may look and sound complicated, but once you get the hang of it, this project will work up quickly.  Ryan was laughing as he helped me proofread this blog post as he did not understand the next part whatsoever as it was so technical!

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I began working double crochets around the edge of the band to create Round 1 of the cabled body of the beanie.  First I chained 2 and then worked one double crochet in the same stitch.  This is important for the invisible seam we will be creating whenever we join each round!  The chain 2 does not count as a stitch in the final stitch count at the end of each round.

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After working 72 double crochets around the band, this is what I was left with.  If you are adjusting this pattern with your own numbers, you need to make sure that the total number of double crochets you are left with is a multiple of 6 (i.e. add or subtract multiples of 6).  Try to space the double crochets as evenly as possible across the band, but it’s not a big deal if some are a little more bunched or spaced apart if you are trying to attain the right number- it will even out in subsequent rounds.  

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When closing up this round, it is important that you join with a slip stitch to the first double crochet and not the Chain 2 (you just ignore the Ch 2 like it’s not there).

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Next you Chain 2…

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Then you work one back post double crochet around the same double crochet that you slip stitched to when you joined the round.  Then you do another back post double crochet around the next double crochet.

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Then the cabling begins!  You skip the next two double crochets and then work two front post treble crochets around the next two stitches.

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Then you work two front post treble crochets around the previously skipped double crochets.  They will cross over the other 2 fptc’s that you just did, which gives the cabling effect.

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Next you work two back post double crochets around the next two stitches.  You continue alternating with this pattern of doing two back post double crochets and working the cabling around the next four stitches.  This is why you must work with multiples of six (two for the bpdc’s and four for the fptc’s).

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When it is time to close up this round and subsequent rounds, make sure you slip stitch to the top of the first Bpdc, not the Chain 2.

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Round 2 is complete!

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To begin Round 3, we chain 2, then do our two bpdc’s.  These bpdc’s help push these stitches back which makes the cabling stand out even more.

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Next we work two Fpdc’s around the two stitches that are underneath the cable.  Make sure you do not accidentally do them around the wrong stitches (i.e. the ones that cross over) as this will undo your cabling!

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Then you work two Fpdc’s around the two stitches that cross over the cabling.  This step helps solidify or lock your cabling from the previous round into place!

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After continuing with this same pattern, here is what you are left with after completing Round 3.  The cabling is really taking shape!

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In Round 4, you do your 2 bpdc’s as normal and then work 4 Fpdc’s as indicated below.

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Our cabling is now complete!  Each cable is worked over three rounds (Rounds 2-4 in this case) and you keep doing this pattern until you are happy with the height of your hat (the more rounds you work, the longer your hat, and the slouchier it will be)!

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The look of cabling is so gorgeous and luxurious as it has such beautiful texture!

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Did you know that cabling could be achieved through crochet?  Once you get the hang of the pattern and how to work the different stitches, this project goes by quickly!

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Using 1 skein of yarn, I was able to go up to Round 19 which resulted in 6 cables.  My hat measured 10” or 25.5 cm including the band.  You could technically finish here if you want to only use one skein of yarn as I know sometimes it’s a hassle to buy another skein, especially if you are going to be using only a part of it.  However, I bought another skein since I wanted my beanie to be slightly longer and I wanted to add a pom pom too…

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I added another 3 rounds to make 7 cables in total, and my hat now measured 11.25” or 29 cm long.  You can keep going if you want your hat to be even slouchier!

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To seam up the top of the hat, I threaded yarn along the last round and pulled tightly to gather it together (similar to how I seamed up my “Easy Ribbed Pom Pom Beanie”).

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After tightly pulling, I was left with a small hole, so I simply sewed it shut. 

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As an alternative, you could also seam up the beanie by pinching the edges and single crocheting them together in a star formation (see video HERE).  I completely forgot about this method until I was re-reading my old “Urban Jungle Slouchy Beanie" post!

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Here is a close-up of the invisible seam!  It blends in so nicely and you would not notice it was there unless you were looking for it!

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I wanted to add a pom pom to this cabled slouchy beanie, and I was excited to put my new Clover Pom Pom maker to use (see my review and step-by-step tutorial on how to use it HERE).  I used the larger size to make the pom pom for my beanie!

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After attaching the pom pom, my “Cabled Slouchy Beanie" was complete!  Isn’t it beautiful?

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Here is the free pattern for my “Cabled Slouchy Beanie" (adult size)!  

Be warned that it looks complicated but once you get the hang of the technique and repetition, it goes by quickly.  Hopefully the step-by-step pictures above will help make the technical pattern easier to understand as well.  With that being said, this is not a beginner’s project as some crochet experience under your belt would greatly help!

Materials:

Special stitches:

  • Front Post Treble Crochet (Fptc)Yarn Over (YO) twice, insert hook from front to back around post of stitch indicated. YO and pull up a loop, [YO and draw through 2 loops on hook] 3 times.
  • Back Post Double Crochet (Bpdc): YO, insert hook behind post of stitch (insert hook from back to front of stitch), YO, pull up a loop, YO, (pull through 2 loops) twice.
  • Front Post Double Crochet (Fpdc): YO, insert hook behind post of stitch (insert hook from front to back of stitch), YO, pull up a loop, YO, (pull through 2 loops) twice. 

Ribbed Band:

Chain 10

R1: In back loops only, Sc 1 in second chain from hook and in each chain across (9 sc).

R2-75: Chain 1, turn.  In back loops only, Sc 1 in second chain from hook and in each chain across (9 sc).

My ribbed band measured 21.5” or 54 cm.  Adjust this number based on your own head size.  Fasten off and leave long end for sewing.  Sew short ends together to form ribbed band.  

Cabled Body:

***In each round, the Ch 2 does not count as a stitch.  When joining at the end of each round, join to the stitch indicated (NOT the Ch 2) to make an invisible seam.

Join yarn with sl st at any point around edge of band.

Round 1: Chain 2, work one double crochet in same st as Chain 2.  Work 71 dc as evenly as possible around edge of band.  Join with sl st to first dc (72 dc).  [If adapting the pattern, make sure your final number of dc’s is a multiple of 6.]  

R2: Chain 2, Bpdc around first dc from previous round (same dc you joined to from Round 1).  Bpdc around next st.  Work cabling: {Skip next two dc, 2 Fptc around next 2 dc.  Fptc around first skipped dc and next dc}.  *2 bpdc in next two st.  Work cabling: Sk next 2 st, 2 Fptc around next 2 st.  Fptc around first skipped st and next st.*, rep 11 times.  Join with sl st to first Bpdc.  (12 cables around with 12 sets of Bpdc’s between)

R3: Chain 2, Bpdc around first Bpdc from previous round.  Bpdc around next st.  Fpdc 4.  *Bpdc 2, Fpdc 4*, rep 11 times .  Join with sl st to first Bpdc.  (12 cables around with 12 sets of Bpdc’s between)

R4: Repeat Round 3.

With rounds 2-4, one set of cables is complete!  Keep repeating Rounds 2-4 until desired length.  

R5-7: same as Round 2-4

R8-10: same as Round 2-4

R11-13: same as Rounds 2-4

R14-16: same as Rounds 2-4

R17-19: same as Rounds 2-4

R20-22: same as Rounds 2-4

I completed 7 sets of cables with my beanie measuring 11.25” or 29 cm (including ribbed band).  Fasten off and leave long end for sewing.  Weave yarn through ends of last round, pull tightly and sew hole shut.  Alternatively, seam up beanie using this method HERE.

Optional: Add pom pom (I used my “Clover Pom Pom Maker”).  Attach pom pom to beanie and you are DONE!

****Important NoteIf you would like to adapt this pattern for a baby, child, teen, etc., please check out this very helpful post by Anne HERE that contains a chart with head circumference sizes (your ribbed band) as well as general hat height (the number of rounds or length of the beanie)! 

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Slouchy beanies have such a cool, effortless look, and they are the perfect fall and winter accessory!

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We enjoyed capturing the beautiful colours of fall with this photoshoot!  I’ve entered my third trimester now and I practically live in leggings and sweaters :)

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[Striped Tunic: Urban Outfitters, Cape Sweater: Aritzia, Boots: Steve Madden; Purse: Coach; Cabled Beanie: Me :D; Belt: Aldo Accessories; Gold Leather Bracelet Cuff: Mahina; Watch: Michael Kors]

I actually also crocheted a “Toddler Cabled Slouchy Beanie" for Myla!  This pattern is really simple to adjust for different sizes as you simply make the ribbed band your desired length and then work the cabled body (see general sizing chart HERE)!

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I adore matching with Myla, and she always loves being able to wear the same thing that I’m wearing too.  Our pom poms look so cute from behind!

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You can find the free pattern for Myla’s “Toddler Cabled Slouchy Beanie" HERE!  

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You can really see the gorgeous cabling in this photo below.  I love how you can make this beanie as slouchy as you want by simply adding more cables and rounds!

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There’s something about the beautiful and rich colours of fall and hearing the leaves crunch below you that makes this time of year very special.  Myla and I had fun examining the leaves together!

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We also had fun throwing the leaves too!  I love her expression with her furrowed brows!

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I am so glad I was able to design a cabled hat as that was something I had always wanted to do ever since making my “Cabled Wrist Warmers" and learning this new technique last year!  Crocheting is such a fun learning process as you try out new patterns, learn new techniques, and apply them to future projects.  I feel so thankful to have this blog where I can document these experiences and projects and share them with you all.  I know that many of you have been learning right alongside with me the whole time as we all grow together and cheer each other on :)  We are constantly encouraged by your support and kind words and have so much fun sharing our projects and patterns with you!

Enjoy learning this new technique and have fun making your own “Cabled Slouchy Beanies”!  The “Toddler Cabled Slouchy Beanie" can be found HERE so you can make matching beanies for your mini-me’s :)  I also actually worked up a “Chunky Cabled Slouchy Beanie" pictured below using super bulky (level 6) yarn, and you can now find the free pattern HERE!  Follow me on Facebook, Twitter (@AllAboutAmi) & Instagram (@AllAboutAmi) to get all my updates!  Enjoy this beautiful fall season 

Amazon Affiliate Links

Lion Brand Heartland Yarn Grand Canyon

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Sneak peek of upcoming new design: Cabled Slouchy Beanies (matching mommy and toddler set)!!!

Step-by-step blog post and free patterns coming next week!

I used the pom poms made with my “Clover Pom Pom Maker" for these beanies!  For those who want to get a head start, I used Lion Brand's Heartland yarn in “Grand Canyon" (1 skein for toddler hat, about 1 1/4 skeins for adult hat)!

Easy Chunky Crochet Sweater

I’ve always wanted to try crocheting some sort of clothing piece that I could wear as I’ve previously made a lot of accessories such as cowls and hats.  I dabbled in sweater-making with Myla’s “Arbor Baby Sweater" but up till now, I could not find a crocheted sweater pattern for adults that I absolutely loved.  Furthermore, I didn’t feel confident enough to try making my own design since I had no previous experience working on an adult sweater.  

Much to my delight, I saw a picture of a gorgeous sweater that draped beautifully on-line, and it turned out to be a free crochet pattern on the Lion Brand Yarns website called the “Simple Crochet Shrug" (see HERE).  When I quickly read through the pattern, I was blown away by its simplicity as the construction was simply one massive rectangle folded in half and then seamed along the sides while leaving arm holes- no other attachments were necessary!  It was a very popular pattern as over 600 people had made this project on Ravelry, and I couldn’t wait to give this sweater a try!

Picking out the colour and yarn I wanted for my sweater was tricky, but eventually we decided upon Bernat’s Softee Chunky in “Grey Ragg”.  It is a very soft yarn that does not fuzz up too easily and I absolutely loved the light grey and white variegation that I knew would give my sweater a beautiful look.  It’s a super bulky (level 6) yarn that has a net weight of 100 g/3.5 oz and approximately 99 m/108 yds.  In total, I used five skeins of this yarn.  Each skein regularly costs $4.99 (Canadian) and with the Michael’s 40% off coupon, each skein came out to $2.99, so the cost of materials for this sweater was very affordable.  You can also find this yarn on Amazon HERE for only $2.74!

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I read through almost all the Ravelry entries of this project to see how other people’s sweaters turned out depending on how many chains they started with, what yarn they used and any other modifications they made.  It was a challenge determining the size as some people’s sweaters turned out too long or too short, and it was hard to judge how tall these people were in their photos.  I wanted to make my sweater oversized and long enough to cover my rear, and I actually ended up making my sweater WAYY too big on the first try.  Sweaters stretch a lot and I decided to frog my work and start over so that I could try and make it the perfect size on the second try!  

I chained 76 using my 10 mm crochet hook.  It is VERY important to note that this initial series of chain stitches will be the LENGTH of your sweater, so determining this initial length is key as you will not be able to change it later on (unless you add some edging at the end).  The rows worked later on will be the width of your sweater.  Do keep in mind that your sweater can stretch later on as you pull it downwards too.  For reference, I am about 5’ 6” tall.  

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To achieve the beautiful ribbing of this sweater, you work single crochets in the back loops only.  As a reminder, the back loops are the loops further away from you while the front loops are the ones closer to you when you’re crocheting.

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You crochet row by row in the back loops only, turning your work as you go.  How simple can this pattern be?  It’s the perfect project to work on when you’re watching tv or having a conversation since you don’t need to keep the count and it works up so quickly since you’re using chunky yarn and such a large crochet hook.  Doesn’t the ribbing give such beautiful texture?

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You keep adding rows until you are happy with the width of your sweater.  In the end, I ended up with 56 rows measuring 31”/79 cm across.  Lengthwise, my rectangle was 38.5”/98 cm (remember that this is capable of stretching quite a bit too).

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Next, you fold the rectangle in half.  It is very important that you fold your rectangle in half so that the rows are running vertically!  I noticed that quite a few people on Ravelry were folding their rectangles the wrong way as their rows were running horizontally.  This meant that their resulting sweaters were very wide and short!

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To create the arm holes, you seam up the sides.

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I seamed up 11”/28 cm and left 8”/20 cm for the arm hole on each side.

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This is how you wear the piece- now it’s looking more sweater-like :)  You’ll notice that the the rows now run horizontally in the front but vertically in the back.  When I was working on this piece and periodically measuring it to my body to check for size, it seemed as though it might end up being too short.  However, we learned from our first experience, and we knew that it was capable of stretching a lot later on.  Thus, don’t be too worried if you think your sweater seems it might be a tad short…

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I wanted to add my own modification to this sweater pattern by adding a special ribbed collar.  To do so, I located the midline of the sweater and attached a stitch marker (you can’t see it too well in the picture below, but there is a peach stitch marker where the midline arrow is pointing to).  Next, I wore the sweater and determined where I wanted the collar to start. I placed a green stitch marker 12 rows below the arm seam on either side (this will vary depending on your height and where you want your own collar to start).  In case you’re interested, I have been using my “Clover Lock Ring Markers" a lot for all my recent projects, and none of them have broken on me (buy them HERE)!

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Starting from the green stitch marker on the left side (when you’re looking at the sweater) and crocheting upwards towards the peach marker, I worked some slip stitches, single crochets, half double crochets and then double crochets in Row 1.  This helped to slowly build up the collar and make it taper towards the ends.  I did the exact same pattern back downwards to the other green stitch marker once I reached the midline at the top to make it symmetrical.  I used a smaller 8 mm crochet hook for this collar part to get tighter, smaller stitches compared to those of the body.  I also tried to pick up stitches quite close together so that there were no gaps in the collar.

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Row 1 is complete!

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Next I alternated front post double crochets with back post double crochets in Row 2 to begin creating a ribbed effect.  

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I did the same thing for Rows 3 and 4 to really emphasize the ribbing.

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The ribbed collar is complete!

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You can fold the collar up…

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And the ribbing is on the other side too :)  I think this ribbed collar is a really nice addition, don’t you?  I’m really happy with how it turned out!

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Here is the pattern for the collar that I added in case you’re interested in crocheting one for your sweater too!

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To access the free Lion Brand pattern for their “Simple Crochet Shrug”, click HERE.  They have also written up patterns for the same shrug using different weights of yarn (e.g. worsted, bulky, super bulky), so see a list of them HERE towards the bottom under “Also available in other Lion Brand yarns" to get an idea of what numbers you should use for your particular yarn.

In summary for my own sweater, I chained 76 initially and did 56 rows of single crochets.  I used a 10 mm crochet hook for the body of the sweater and 5 skeins of yarn.  Keep in mind that these numbers will vary for yourself depending on how long and wide you want your sweater to be (and depending on your height), what hook size and yarn you use (worsted, bulky, super bulky) and how tightly you crochet (smaller, tighter stitches will result in your sweater stretching less while loose stitches will result in more stretching).

Collar Pattern:

- Tag upper midline with stitch marker.

- Tag sides with stitch markers indicating where you want your collar to begin and end (12 rows below arm seam for mine).

{Sl st = slip stitch, Sc = single crochet, Hdc = half double crochet, Fpdc = front post double crochet, Bpdc = back post double crochet (learn how to do Fpdc’s HERE and Bpdc’s HERE)}

Using 8 mm hook,

R1: Sl st 2, Sc 2, Hdc 2, Dc 57 (or however many it takes for you to reach stitch marker at upper midline- space your stitches close together so that there are no gaps). Dc at stitch marker.  Repeat exact same pattern down the other way to your stitch marker: Dc 57, Hdc 2, Sc 2, Sl st 2.  Slip stitch to next stitch, turn. 

R2: Sl st 2, Sc 2, Hdc 2, alternate fpdc and bpdc around (i.e. start with fpdc, bpdc, fpdc, bpdc, etc) until 6 stitches left.  Hdc 2, sc 2, sl st 2. Slip stitch to next stitch, turn.

R3: Same as R2 but alternate bpdc with fpdc (i.e. start with bpdc, fpdc, bpdc, fpdc, etc) to ensure that ribbing is building up.

R4: Same as R2.

Fasten off and weave in ends.

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I was incredibly excited to try on my new sweater and we took advantage of the last days of summer weather to do a photoshoot before the snow comes!  This sweater is so versatile as it looks cute over a dress, and I can see myself wearing this in the winter with leggings and tall boots too!

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I’ll be able to wear this as my pregnant belly continues to grow as I enter my third trimester soon- oversized cardigans and sweaters are a must as winter and sweater weather rolls around!  I practically lived in my nursing tank tops with blazers and cardigans over top when I was nursing Myla (see my Maternity Fashion HERE and my Nursing Fashion HERE), so I know I’ll be wearing this sweater a lot post partum, especially since we’re having a winter baby.

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I’m really happy with how the sizing of the sweater turned out as the length is not too long or too short.  The ginormous sweater I made on my first try (I chained 100 and did 68 rows) made me look like I was being engulfed in a blanket as it extended down towards my calves!  

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The vertical ribbing looks beautiful from behind.  This sweater is so incredibly luxurious and romantic…

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This sweater does tend to bunch around the bum area a bit due to its construction, but it’s not a big deal…

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Popping up my ribbed collar!  If you don’t want to add this special collar or you think it might be too difficult, you could always simply crochet more rows when working on your big rectangle to increase its width.  The piece will naturally fold to give a collar if it’s wide enough.  

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You could also add some buttons to this sweater if you wanted some closure!  I myself love how it hangs and drapes naturally when I wear it. Another modification you could try is adding sleeves by crocheting around the armholes too!

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[Dress: Urban Outfitters, Boots: Steve Madden; Purse: Coach; Sweater: Me :D; Bracelet: Mikaylove; Necklace: Mahina; Watch: Michael Kors]

I know people tend to whip out their crochet hooks as temperatures drop and fall and winter begin, so this is the perfect project to work on!  Sweater weather will soon be upon us, and it is actually currently snowing where I live as I write this post (ahh, the fleeting days of summer).  This sweater is so incredibly simple to crochet and the results are gorgeous, like something you would see in a high end fashion boutique.  It’s a great beginner’s project, and it’s such an amazing feeling being able to wear something you created with your own two hands from scratch (I love seeing the looks on people’s faces when they discover that I made my crocheted pieces)!  Let me know what you think of this sweater in the comments below, if you’ll be trying out this design, and if you’ve come across any other sweater patterns that you’ve loved.  If you do end up making your own sweater, I think it’d be really helpful to leave a comment below letting us know what yarn you used and how many chains and rows you ended up going with too :)

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Here are some of my previous winter crochet projects in case you’re interested in crocheting some hats and cowls while you’re at it!  From left to right and top to bottom we have the Easy Ribbed Pom Pom Beanie, Knotted Headband, Puff Stitch Cowl, Buttoned Shell Stitch Cowl, Long Double Crochet Cowl, and Urban Jungle Slouchy Beanie.  The “Easy Ribbed Pom Pom Beanie" has a similar construction to this sweater and is a great beginner’s project!  Don’t forget to keep up with me on my Facebook, Twitter and Instagram as I’m putting the final touches on a lot of new designs and projects.  I’ve been on a crocheting frenzy as I try and bring to life all the designs swirling in my mind before Baby #2 comes and life gets extremely busy!  Enjoy making your own beautiful sweaters and let me know how it goes!

Sneak peek of upcoming blog post & step-by-step tutorial: Easy Chunky Crochet Sweater

Sneak peek of upcoming blog post & step-by-step tutorial: Easy Chunky Crochet Sweater

Last Christmas I whipped up some of these adorable coffee sleeves as gifts and was delighted with how they turned out!  I recently pulled out the pattern again and thought I would blog about it since I love them so much :)
You might be wondering what crochet stitch this coffee sleeve uses since it has such a beautiful braided look: it’s actually the half double crochet!  Instead of crocheting in both the front and back loops, you crochet in the third loop (found below the back loop of half double crochets).  This free pattern is by “Frayed Knot" and is called the "15 Min Coffee Sleeve”- it’s true that it works up extremely quickly, and adding a button is such a cute touch.  So if you’re in a scramble for a quick handmade gift, check out this free pattern HERE!

Last Christmas I whipped up some of these adorable coffee sleeves as gifts and was delighted with how they turned out!  I recently pulled out the pattern again and thought I would blog about it since I love them so much :)

You might be wondering what crochet stitch this coffee sleeve uses since it has such a beautiful braided look: it’s actually the half double crochet!  Instead of crocheting in both the front and back loops, you crochet in the third loop (found below the back loop of half double crochets).  This free pattern is by “Frayed Knot" and is called the "15 Min Coffee Sleeve”- it’s true that it works up extremely quickly, and adding a button is such a cute touch.  So if you’re in a scramble for a quick handmade gift, check out this free pattern HERE!

I attended my cousin’s wedding over the weekend and made this card for the newly married couple!  I always turn to the free simple heart pattern on “Little Birdie Secrets" found HERE when I want to add a touch of crochet to my cards.  I simply use hot glue to attach the crocheted heart to the cardstock (I used hot glue to attach the lace as well).  There are so many fun free crochet appliques out there (cupcakes, moustaches, snowmen), and I think they add such a beautiful surprise to cards!  Check out this list of free crochet appliques HERE and start dreaming up what kind of handmade birthday, wedding or Christmas cards you can make ❤

I attended my cousin’s wedding over the weekend and made this card for the newly married couple!  I always turn to the free simple heart pattern on “Little Birdie Secrets" found HERE when I want to add a touch of crochet to my cards.  I simply use hot glue to attach the crocheted heart to the cardstock (I used hot glue to attach the lace as well).  There are so many fun free crochet appliques out there (cupcakes, moustaches, snowmen), and I think they add such a beautiful surprise to cards!  Check out this list of free crochet appliques HERE and start dreaming up what kind of handmade birthday, wedding or Christmas cards you can make 

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